Kashish Rastogi — September 4, 2021
Beginner Data Exploration Data Visualization Libraries Programming Python Structured Data

This article was published as a part of the  Data Science Blogathon

EDA of Netflix data with Plotly
Image 1

In this blog, We are going to talk about some of the advanced and most used charts in Plotly while doing analysis. All you need to know is Plotly for visualization!

Table of content

  • Description of Dataset
  • Data Exploration
  • Data Cleaning
  • Data visualization
  • The questions which we are going to answer with the charts
    • Correlation between the features
    • Most watched shows on the Netflix
    • Distribution of Ratings
    • Which has the highest rating Tv show or Movies
    • Finding the best Month for releasing content
    • Highest watched genres on Netflix
    • Released movie over the years

Data for EDA of Netflix Data with Plotly

We are going to work on the Netflix movies and TV Show dataset you can find this dataset on Kaggle. If you like to see the whole notebook you can visit it here(https://www.kaggle.com/kashishrastogi/guide-for-plotly-for-beginners). Netflix is an application that keeps growing exponentially whole around the world and it is the most famous streaming platform.

Let’s create an EDA through this data with beautiful charts and visuals to gain some insights.

Importing library

import pandas as pd

import plotly.express as px

import plotly.graph_objects as go

from plotly.subplots import make_subplots

import plotly.figure_factory as ff

 

Let’s see the Netflix data

df = pd.read_csv(r'D:netflix_titles.csv')
df.head(3)
dataset | EDA Netflix with Plotly

Dataset

 

Description of Netflix Dataset

This dataset contains data collected from Netflix of different TV shows and movies from the year 2008 to 2021.

  • type: Gives information about 2 different unique values one is TV Show and another is Movie
  • title: Gives information about the title of Movie or TV Show
  • director: Gives information about the director who directed the Movie or TV Show
  • cast: Gives information about the cast who plays role in Movie or TV Show
  • release_year: Gives information about the year when Movie or TV Show was released
  • rating: Gives information about the Movie or TV Show are in which category (eg like the movies are only for students, or adults, etc)
  • duration: Gives information about the duration of Movie or TV Show
  • listed_in: Gives information about the genre of Movie or TV Show
  • description: Gives information about the description of Movie or TV Show

Data Exploration

Exploring the data

df.info()
data.info

 

Finding if the dataset contains null values

df.isnull().sum()
finding null values | EDA Netflix with Plotly

 

Finding how many unique values are there in the dataset

df.nunique()
finding unique values

Data Cleaning

Dropping the cast and director features because we are not going to use those features right now.

df = df.dropna( how='any',subset=['cast', 'director'])

Replacing null values with ‘missing’

df['country'].fillna('Missing',inplace=True)
df['date_added'].fillna('Missing',inplace=True)
df['rating'].fillna('Missing',inplace=True)
df.isnull().sum().sum()

Converting into a proper date-time format and adding two more features year and month.

df["date_added"] = pd.to_datetime(df['date_added'])
df['year_added'] = df['date_added'].dt.year
df['month_added'] = df['date_added'].dt.month
Finding seasons from durations
df['season_count'] = df.apply(lambda x : x['duration'].split(" ")[0] if "Season" in x['duration'] else "", axis = 1)
df['duration'] = df.apply(lambda x : x['duration'].split(" ")[0] if "Season" not in x['duration'] else "", axis = 1)

Renaming the ‘listed_in’ feature to the genre for easy use.

df = df.rename(columns={"listed_in":"genre"})
df['genre'] = df['genre'].apply(lambda x: x.split(",")[0])
df.head()
cleaned dataset

After data cleaning the dataset look like this

Let’s see the distribution of data

df.describe(include='O')

Now let’s start the fun and gain some insights from the data.

Data Visualization

Now if we look at the data, we have some questions ready like

  • What is the ratio of Movie and TV Shows on Netflix
  • Distribution of Rating in Netflix
  • Which has the highest rating Tv Shows or Movies on Netflix

There are many more questions that we can answer we will see them in further blogs.

Chart 1

Viewing the correlation between the features.

# Heatmap
# Correlation between the feature show with the help of visualisation
corrs = df.corr()
fig_heatmap = ff.create_annotated_heatmap(
    z=corrs.values,
    x=list(corrs.columns),
    y=list(corrs.index),
    annotation_text=corrs.round(2).values,
    showscale=True)
fig_heatmap.update_layout(title= 'Correlation of whole Data',  
                          plot_bgcolor='#2d3035', paper_bgcolor='#2d3035',
                          title_font=dict(size=25, color='#a5a7ab', family="Muli, sans-serif"),
                          font=dict(color='#8a8d93'))
correlation matrix | EDA Netflix with Plotly

HeatMap in Plotly

Chart 2

Our first chart will tell us about the most-watched show on Netflix.

The reason for plotting the chart?

Which will tell us about what the audience prefers to watch. So Netflix can decide what type of content they should publish to make the audience happy.

fig_donut = px.pie(df, names='type', height=300, width=600, hole=0.7,

title='Most watched on Netflix',

color_discrete_sequence=['#b20710', '#221f1f'])

fig_donut.update_traces(hovertemplate=None, textposition='outside',

textinfo='percent+label', rotation=90)

fig_donut.update_layout(margin=dict(t=60, b=30, l=0, r=0), showlegend=False,

plot_bgcolor='#333', paper_bgcolor='#333',

title_font=dict(size=25, color='#8a8d93', family="Lato, sans-serif"),

font=dict(size=17, color='#8a8d93'),

hoverlabel=dict(bgcolor="#444", font_size=13,

font_family="Lato, sans-serif"))

 

 

donut chart | EDA Netflix with Plotly

Donut chart in Plotly

Well, audience prefers Movies over TV Show as 97% audience like Movies.

Chart 3

Distribution of Rating and finding what audience prefer to watch.

The reason for plotting the chart?

To know which type of content is most watched by the audience so that Netflix can decide what type of content to be released next. It helps Netflix to understand the most and least favourite content watched by an audience.

df_rating = pd.DataFrame(df['rating'].value_counts()).reset_index().rename(columns={'index':'rating','rating':'count'})

fig_bar = px.bar(df_rating, y='rating', x='count', title='Distribution of Rating',

color_discrete_sequence=['#b20710'], text='count')

fig_bar.update_xaxes(showgrid=False)

fig_bar.update_yaxes(showgrid=False, categoryorder='total ascending', ticksuffix=' ', showline=False)

fig_bar.update_traces(hovertemplate=None, marker=dict(line=dict(width=0)))

fig_bar.update_layout(margin=dict(t=80, b=0, l=70, r=40),

hovermode="y unified",

xaxis_title=' ', yaxis_title=" ", height=400,

plot_bgcolor='#333', paper_bgcolor='#333',

title_font=dict(size=25, color='#8a8d93', family="Lato, sans-serif"),

font=dict(color='#8a8d93'),

legend=dict(orientation="h", yanchor="bottom", y=1, xanchor="center", x=0.5),

hoverlabel=dict(bgcolor="black", font_size=13, font_family="Lato, sans-serif")) 

 

Bar chart | EDA Netflix with Plotly

Bar chart in Plotly

Interpreting the chart

The audience prefers TV-MA and TV-14 shows more and the least preferred rating shows are Nc-17.  Most of the content watched by the audience is for a mature audience. The TV-MA rating is a type of rating given by the TV parental guidelines to a television program.

The second largest type of rating watched by the audience is TV-14 which is inappropriate for children younger than age 14. The conclusion is drawn here is most of the audience is of mature age. For more tricks and tips to make the bar chart interesting give a look here.

Chart 4

We will see which has the highest rating TV Shows or Movies.

The reason for plotting the chart?

I have used a bidirectional bar chart here to show the comparison between the TV shows and Movies vs Ratings. Creating two different bar charts one for TV Show and another for Movie doesn’t make sense but combining a user can easily understand the difference.

# making a copy of df
dff = df.copy()
# making 2 df one for tv show and another for movie with rating 
df_tv_show = dff[dff['type']=='TV Show'][['rating', 'type']].rename(columns={'type':'tv_show'})
df_movie = dff[dff['type']=='Movie'][['rating', 'type']].rename(columns={'type':'movie'})
df_tv_show = pd.DataFrame(df_tv_show.rating.value_counts()).reset_index().rename(columns={'index':'tv_show'})
df_tv_show['rating_final'] = df_tv_show['rating'] 
# making rating column value negative
df_tv_show['rating'] *= -1
df_movie = pd.DataFrame(df_movie.rating.value_counts()).reset_index().rename(columns={'index':'movie'})

Here for the bi-directional chart, we will make 2 different data frames one for Movies and another one for TV Shows having ratings in them.

We are making 2 subplots and they are sharing the y-axis.

fig = make_subplots(rows=1, cols=2, specs=[[{}, {}]], shared_yaxes=True, horizontal_spacing=0)
# bar plot for tv shows
fig.append_trace(go.Bar(x=df_tv_show.rating, y=df_tv_show.tv_show, orientation='h', showlegend=True, 
                        text=df_tv_show.rating_final, name='TV Show', marker_color='#221f1f'), 1, 1)
# bar plot for movies
fig.append_trace(go.Bar(x=df_movie.rating, y=df_movie.movie, orientation='h', showlegend=True, text=df_movie.rating,
                        name='Movie', marker_color='#b20710'), 1, 2)
fig.update_xaxes(showgrid=False)
fig.update_yaxes(showgrid=False, categoryorder='total ascending', ticksuffix=' ', showline=False)
fig.update_traces(hovertemplate=None, marker=dict(line=dict(width=0)))
fig.update_layout(title='Which has the highest rating TV shows or Movies?',
                  margin=dict(t=80, b=0, l=70, r=40),
                  hovermode="y unified", 
                  xaxis_title=' ', yaxis_title=" ",
                  plot_bgcolor='#333', paper_bgcolor='#333',
                  title_font=dict(size=25, color='#8a8d93', family="Lato, sans-serif"),
                  font=dict(color='#8a8d93'),
                  legend=dict(orientation="h", yanchor="bottom", y=1, xanchor="center", x=0.5),
                  hoverlabel=dict(bgcolor="black", font_size=13, font_family="Lato, sans-serif"))
fig.add_annotation(dict(x=0.81, y=0.6, ax=0, ay=0,
                    xref = "paper", yref = "paper",
                    text= "97% people prefer Movies over TV Shows on Netflix.
 Large number of people watch TV-MA rating  
 Movies which are for mature audience."
                  ))
fig.add_annotation(dict(x=0.2, y=0.2, ax=0, ay=0,
                    xref = "paper", yref = "paper",
                    text= "3% people prefer TV Shows on Netflix.
 There is no inappropriate content for
 ages 17 and under in TV Shows."
                  ))
diverging bar charrt | EDA Netflix with Plotly

Bi-directional Bar Chart in Plotly

As you see here I have added text into the chart which gives the additional information to the user while reading the charts. It is a good practice to give additional information in the chart if needed.

Chart 5

If a producer wants to release a show which month is the best month to release it.

The reason for plotting the chart

The best month to release content so the producer can gain much revenue. Most of the holidays came in December month so to releases a Movie or TV show in December is the best way to earn a lot of profit as the whole family will be spending time with each other and watching shows.

df_month = pd.DataFrame(df.month_added.value_counts()).reset_index().rename(columns={'index':'month','month_added':'count'})
# converting month number to month name
df_month['month_final'] = df_month['month'].replace({1:'Jan', 2:'Feb', 3:'Mar', 4:'Apr', 5:'May', 6:'June', 7:'July', 8:'Aug', 9:'Sep', 10:'Oct', 11:'Nov', 12:'Dec'})
df_month[:2]
month counts

Replacing month number to month name for a better visualization

fig_month = px.funnel(df_month, x='count', y='month_final', title='Best month for releasing Content',
                      height=350, width=600, color_discrete_sequence=['#b20710'])
fig_month.update_xaxes(showgrid=False, ticksuffix=' ', showline=True)
fig_month.update_traces(hovertemplate=None, marker=dict(line=dict(width=0)))
fig_month.update_layout(margin=dict(t=60, b=20, l=70, r=40),
                        xaxis_title=' ', yaxis_title=" ",
                        plot_bgcolor='#333', paper_bgcolor='#333',
                        title_font=dict(size=25, color='#8a8d93', family="Lato, sans-serif"),
                        font=dict(color='#8a8d93'),
                        hoverlabel=dict(bgcolor="black", font_size=13, font_family="Lato, sans-serif"))
funnel chart | EDA Netflix with Plotly

Funnel Chart in Plotly

Ending and starting of the year December and January is the best month to release content. The best 4 months to release content are October,  November, December, and January.

Chart 6

Finding the highest watched genres on Netflix

The reason for plotting the chart

To know more about the distribution of genres and see which type of content do audience prefers to watch. So Netflix can decide and take movies or tv shows of the highest watched genres which will benefit Netflix in a long run.

df_genre = pd.DataFrame(df.genre.value_counts()).reset_index().rename(columns={'index':'genre', 'genre':'count'})
fig_tree = px.treemap(df_genre, path=[px.Constant("Distribution of Geners"), 'count','genre'])
fig_tree.update_layout(title='Highest watched Geners on Netflix',
                  margin=dict(t=50, b=0, l=70, r=40),
                  plot_bgcolor='#333', paper_bgcolor='#333',
                  title_font=dict(size=25, color='#fff', family="Lato, sans-serif"),
                  font=dict(color='#8a8d93'),
                  hoverlabel=dict(bgcolor="#444", font_size=13, font_family="Lato, sans-serif"))
treemap | EDA Netflix with Plotly

TreeMap in Plotly

Drama is the highest preferred show by the audience then comes the comedy show and action show, the least preferred show is of LGBTQ movies.

Chart 7

Let’s see how many movies were released over the years with a waterfall chart.

The reason for plotting the chart

We want to see what is the distribution of releases of a movie or tv show in terms of years. Do the releases increase or decrease with the years. We can easily compare if the release of movies is decreasing or increasing by year by year with the help of a waterfall chart.

Code

We will create a data frame that only consists of Movie shows

d2 = df[df["type"] == "Movie"]
d2[:2]

We will create a data frame where we will show how many movies were released each year.

col ='year_added'

vc2 = d2[col].value_counts().reset_index().rename(columns = {col : "count", "index" : col})

vc2['percent'] = vc2['count'].apply(lambda x : 100*x/sum(vc2['count']))

vc2 = vc2.sort_values(col)

vc2[:3]

 

year wise

Now let’s make a waterfall chart for easy comparison of all the years

fig1 = go.Figure(go.Waterfall(
    name = "Movie", orientation = "v", 
    x = vc2['year_added'].values,
    textposition = "auto",
    text = ["1", "2", "1", "13", "3", "6", "14", "48", "204", "743", "1121", "1366", "1228", "84"],
    y = [1, 2, -1, 13, -3, 6, 14, 48, 204, 743, 1121, 1366, -1228, -84],
    connector = {"line":{"color":"#b20710"}},
    increasing = {"marker":{"color":"#b20710"}},
    decreasing = {"marker":{"color":"orange"}},
))
fig1.show()
waterfall chart | EDA Netflix with Plotly

Waterfall chart in Plotly

The highest number of movies were released in 2019 and 2018 due to the covid releasing of movies were significantly dropped.

Note: Here yellow color shows the decrement and the red color shows the increment

Chart 8

What is the impact of Netflix TV Shows or Movies over the years by comparing both.

d1 = df[df["type"] == "TV Show"]
d2 = df[df["type"] == "Movie"]
col = "year_added"
vc1 = d1[col].value_counts().reset_index().rename(columns = {col : "count", "index" : col})
vc1['percent'] = vc1['count'].apply(lambda x : 100*x/sum(vc1['count']))
vc1 = vc1.sort_values(col)
vc2 = d2[col].value_counts().reset_index().rename(columns = {col : "count", "index" : col})
vc2['percent'] = vc2['count'].apply(lambda x : 100*x/sum(vc2['count']))
vc2 = vc2.sort_values(col)
trace1 = go.Scatter(x=vc1[col], y=vc1["count"], name="TV Shows", marker=dict(color="orange"), )
trace2 = go.Scatter(x=vc2[col], y=vc2["count"], name="Movies", marker=dict(color="#b20710"))
data = [trace1, trace2]
fig_line = go.Figure(data)
fig_line.update_traces(hovertemplate=None)
fig_line.update_xaxes(showgrid=False)
fig_line.update_yaxes(showgrid=False)
large_title_format = 'Tv Show and Movies impact over the Year'
small_title_format = "Due to Covid updatation of content is slowed." 
fig_line.update_layout(title=large_title_format + " " + small_title_format, 
    height=400, margin=dict(t=130, b=0, l=70, r=40), 
    hovermode="x unified", xaxis_title=' ', 
    yaxis_title=" ", plot_bgcolor='#333', paper_bgcolor='#333', 
    title_font=dict(size=25, color='#8a8d93',
    family="Lato, sans-serif"),
    font=dict(color='#8a8d93'),
    legend=dict(orientation="h",
    yanchor="bottom",
    y=1,
    xanchor="center",
    x=0.5)) 
fig_line.add_annotation(dict
    (x=0.8, 
    y=0.3,
    ax=0, 
    ay=0,
    xref = "paper",
    yref = "paper",
    text= "Highest number of Tv Shows were released in 2019 followed by 2017." )) 
fig_line.add_annotation(dict
    (x=0.9, 
    y=1,
    ax=0,
    ay=0,
    xref = "paper",
    yref = "paper",
    text= "Highest number of Movies were relased in 2019 followed by 2020" )) 
fig_line.show()
line chart | EDA Netflix with Plotly

                                                                                   Line Chart in Plotly

After the year 2019 covid came that badly affects Netflix for producing content. Movies have exponential growth from the start but due to covid, it is going downwards.

Conclusion

We explore the Netflix dataset and saw how to clean the data and then jump into how to visualize the data. We saw some basic and advanced level charts of Plotly like Heatmap, Donut chart, Bar chart, Funnel chart, Bi-directional Bar chart, Treemap, Waterfall chart, Line chart.

If you have any questions feel free to write in comments.

References

  1. Image 1-  https://unsplash.com/photos/yubCnXAA3H8
  2. Dataset – https://www.kaggle.com/shivamb/netflix-shows

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